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dc.contributor.authorJonsson, Bror
dc.contributor.authorJonsson, Nina
dc.contributor.authorFinstad, Anders G.
dc.date.accessioned2014-11-19T11:55:03Z
dc.date.accessioned2018-09-10T11:44:05Z
dc.date.available2014-11-19T11:55:03Z
dc.date.available2018-09-10T11:44:05Z
dc.date.issued2014
dc.identifier.citationMarine Ecology Progress Series 2014, 515:217-226nb_NO
dc.identifier.issn0171-8630
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11250/2561766
dc.description.abstractThe expression of fitness-related traits, such as egg and gonad size, often varies among habitats and exhibits clinal variation along climatic and latitudinal gradients. However, the mechanisms allowing such variations are obscure and have been ascribed to both phenotypic plasticity and genetic adaptation. We experimentally tested whether variation in egg and gonad size of a poikilotherm vertebrate is influenced by the temperature individuals experienced during embryogenesis, possibly as an epigenetic effect. Atlantic salmon Salmo salar eggs were incubated under 3 embryonic thermal regimes: cold, mixed and warm treatments. The cold group received ambient river water (mean ± SD: 2.6 ± 0.4°C) and the warm group received water at 4.6°C above ambient temperature, the expected temperature in the river towards the end of this century, from fertilization until exogenous feeding commenced. The mixed group received ambient river water until hatching, whereupon the larvae received heated water until exogenous feeding commenced. When exogenous feeding was initiated, all fish were reared under identical, natural thermal conditions. At adulthood, fish that developed from warm-incubated eggs were largest, had the highest mass−length relationship and developed larger eggs and higher gonad mass relative to their own body size. There was no similar effect of thermal environment during larval development. The treatment did not affect age of maturity or fecundity. Thus, thermal conditions during embryo - genesis affected the expression of adult life-history traits, a mechanism by which fish may rapidly change the size of their propagules to the anticipated thermal offspring environment. This is a novel result explaining variation in these core life-history traits. Egg size · Epigenetics · Fecundity · Gonad mass · Phenotypic plasticity · Salmo salar · Thermal regimenb_NO
dc.language.isoengnb_NO
dc.subjectEgg sizenb_NO
dc.subjectEpigeneticsnb_NO
dc.subjectFecunditynb_NO
dc.subjectGonad massnb_NO
dc.subjectPhenotypic plasticitynb_NO
dc.subjectSalmo salarnb_NO
dc.subjectThermal regimenb_NO
dc.titleLinking embryonic temperature with adultreproductive investment in Atlantic salmonSalmo salarnb_NO
dc.typePeer reviewednb_NO
dc.date.updated2014-11-19T11:55:03Z
dc.description.versionpublishedVersionnb_NO
dc.rights.holder© Inter-Research 2014nb_NO
dc.subject.nsiVDP::Matematikk og Naturvitenskap: 400::Zoologiske og botaniske fag: 480nb_NO
dc.source.pagenumber217-226nb_NO
dc.source.volume515nb_NO
dc.source.journalMarine Ecology Progress Seriesnb_NO
dc.identifier.doi10.3354/meps11006
dc.identifier.cristin1174650
dc.relation.projectNorges forskningsråd: 225014nb_NO
dc.relation.projectNorsk institutt for naturforskning: Strategic grantsnb_NO


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