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dc.contributor.authorBurr, Zofia M.
dc.contributor.authorVarpe, Øystein
dc.contributor.authorAnker-Nilssen, Tycho
dc.contributor.authorErikstad, Kjell E
dc.contributor.authorDescamps, Sébastien
dc.contributor.authorBarrett, Robert T
dc.contributor.authorBech, Claus
dc.contributor.authorChristensen-Dalsgaard, Signe
dc.contributor.authorLorentsen, Svein-Håkon
dc.contributor.authorMoe, Børge
dc.contributor.authorReiertsen, Tone Kristin
dc.contributor.authorStrøm, Hallvard
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-06T08:15:48Z
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-07T12:37:54Z
dc.date.available2016-06-06T08:15:48Z
dc.date.available2016-06-07T12:37:54Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationEcosphere 2016, 7(5)nb_NO
dc.identifier.issn2150-8925
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11250/2391727
dc.description.abstractIn seasonal environments, organisms are expected to optimally schedule reproduction within an annual range of environmental conditions. Latitudinal gradients generate a range of seasonality to which we can expect adaptations to have evolved, and can be used to explore drivers of timing strategies across species’ distribution ranges. This study compares the timing of egg hatching in four seabird species (Atlantic puffin Fratercula arctica, black-legged kittiwake Rissa tridactyla, common guillemot Uria aalge, and Brünnich’s guillemot U. lomvia) covering a subarctic to Arctic latitudinal gradient along the Norwegian coast to Svalbard (65–79°N). Hatching was significantly delayed by an estimated 1.7, 2.3, and 1.9 d per latitudinal degree for puffins, kittiwakes, and common guillemots, respectively, but was not delayed for Brünnich’s guillemots. Hatching distributions revealed an increase in intra-annual breeding synchronicity along a latitudinal gradient for kittiwakes only, whereas the two guillemots exhibited high hatching synchronicity at all colonies. We used this large-scale, multispecies timing data series to discuss constraints, adaptations, and mechanisms affecting breeding timing, a necessary step to recognize risks to populations and predict future ecosystem change. Arctic; Fratercula arctica; hatching timing; inter-annual variability; Rissa tridactyla; seasonality; spatial phenology; Uria aalge; Uria lomvia. Receivednb_NO
dc.language.isoengnb_NO
dc.rightsNavngivelse-Ikkekommersiell-DelPåSammeVilkår 3.0 Norge*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0/no/*
dc.subjectArcticnb_NO
dc.subjectFratercula arcticanb_NO
dc.subjecthatching timingnb_NO
dc.subjectRissa tridactylanb_NO
dc.subjectseasonalitynb_NO
dc.subjectspatial phenologynb_NO
dc.subjectUria aalgenb_NO
dc.subjectUria lomvianb_NO
dc.subjectinter-annual variabilitynb_NO
dc.titleLater at higher latitudes: large-scale variability in seabird breeding timing and synchronicitynb_NO
dc.typePeer reviewednb_NO
dc.date.updated2016-06-06T08:15:48Z
dc.source.volume7nb_NO
dc.source.journalEcospherenb_NO
dc.source.issue5nb_NO
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/ecs2.1283
dc.identifier.cristin1359716


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Navngivelse-Ikkekommersiell-DelPåSammeVilkår 3.0 Norge
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Navngivelse-Ikkekommersiell-DelPåSammeVilkår 3.0 Norge