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dc.contributor.authorDescamps, Sébastien
dc.contributor.authorRamírez, Francisco
dc.contributor.authorBenjaminsen, Sigurd
dc.contributor.authorAnker-Nilssen, Tycho
dc.contributor.authorBarrett, Robert
dc.contributor.authorBurr, Zofia
dc.contributor.authorChristensen-Dalsgaard, Signe
dc.contributor.authorErikstad, Kjell-Einar
dc.contributor.authorIrons, David B.
dc.contributor.authorLorentsen, Svein-Håkon
dc.contributor.authorMallory, Mark L.
dc.contributor.authorRobertson, Gregory J.
dc.contributor.authorReiertsen, Tone Kristin
dc.contributor.authorStrøm, Hallvard
dc.contributor.authorVarpe, Øystein
dc.contributor.authorLavergne, Sébastien
dc.coverage.spatialArcticnb_NO
dc.date.accessioned2019-09-09T09:52:10Z
dc.date.available2019-09-09T09:52:10Z
dc.date.issued2019
dc.identifier.issn1354-1013
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11250/2614272
dc.description.abstractThe timing of annual events such as reproduction is a critical component of how free‐living organisms respond to ongoing climate change. This may be especially true in the Arctic, which is disproportionally impacted by climate warming. Here, we show that Arctic seabirds responded to climate change by moving the start of their reproduction earlier, coincident with an advancing onset of spring and that their response is phylogenetically and spatially structured. The phylogenetic signal is likely driven by seabird foraging behavior. Surface‐feeding species advanced their reproduction in the last 35 years while diving species showed remarkably stable breeding timing. The earlier reproduction for Arctic surface‐feeding birds was significant in the Pacific only, where spring advancement was most pronounced. In both the Atlantic and Pacific, seabirds with a long breeding season showed a greater response to the advancement of spring than seabirds with a short breeding season. Our results emphasize that spatial variation, phylogeny, and life history are important considerations in seabird phenological response to climate change and highlight the key role played by the species’ foraging behavior.nb_NO
dc.language.isoengnb_NO
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internasjonal*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/deed.no*
dc.subjectbreeding phenologynb_NO
dc.subjectclimate warmingnb_NO
dc.subjectforaging strategynb_NO
dc.subjectphylogenynb_NO
dc.subjectspring onsetnb_NO
dc.titleDiverging phenological responses of Arctic seabirds to an earlier springnb_NO
dc.typePeer reviewednb_NO
dc.description.versionpublishedVersionnb_NO
dc.rights.holder©2019TheAuthors.nb_NO
dc.subject.nsiVDP::Matematikk og Naturvitenskap: 400::Zoologiske og botaniske fag: 480nb_NO
dc.source.journalGlobal Change Biologynb_NO
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/gcb.14780
dc.identifier.cristin1722213


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Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internasjonal
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